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Accessing water in Liberia

Poverty, News/feature, Africa, Liberia, 2015
Children gather around a newly installed water pump in Mulbah Town, Liberia.

Children gather around a newly installed water pump in Mulbah Town, Liberia.

The Liberian government has just launched a major new Water, Sanitation and Hygiene programme, through support from Irish Aid.

The programme will improve the provision of water and sanitation services in health facilities, schools and rural underserved communities in Liberia. Over 50,000 people will benefit from the programme across five counties - Grand Cape Mount, Lofa, Rivercess, Sinoe and Rural Montserrado counties.

Only 25% of the population in Liberia have access to improved sanitation, and only 62% have access to improved drinking sources. The lack of adequate services can have a devastating effect on quality of life, especially through the spread of water-borne diseases such as cholera, dysentery and typhoid.  Water-borne diseases cause 1.8 million human deaths annually.

Almost half a million people in 12 out of Liberia’s 15 counties have access to safe water due to support from Irish Aid.

This programme is the latest in a long history of support from Irish Aid to water and sanitation services in Liberia. Almost half a million people in 12 out of Liberia’s 15 counties have access to safe water due to support from Irish Aid.

In 2014, Ireland provided €6.28m in funding to Liberia, through the bilateral country programme, through Irish NGOs and through humanitarian assistance, primarily in response to the Ebola outbreak.  Due to the Ebola crisis in 2014/2015, Irish Aid’s new strategy for Liberia, due to begin in 2015, will now commence in 2017. 

Learn more about Irish Aid’s programme in Liberia and our support to water and sanitation.